1. annaverity:

Guess there’s really something to that whole, Movies with female leads don’t do well schtick.

    annaverity:

    Guess there’s really something to that whole, Movies with female leads don’t do well schtick.

  2. There are so many writers of color out there, and often what they get when they bring their books to their editors, they say, ‘We don’t relate to the character.’ Well it’s not for you to relate to! And why can’t you expand yourself so you can relate to the humanity of a character as opposed to the color of what they are?

    — Anika Noni Rose in Vanity Fair, via this excellent Buzzfeed article on diversity in publishing. (via leeandlow)

  3. BLACK WIDOW #8
NATHAN EDMONDSON (W) • PHIL NOTO (A/C)• On a snowy night in Prague, Natasha must fight her way out of disaster alongside the WINTER SOLDIER!• Meanwhile, Isaiah has business of his own in London, but a simple plan gets complicated.• Nathan Edmonson and Phil Noto continue their uninterrupted run on one of the most acclaimed books of the year.

    BLACK WIDOW #8
    NATHAN EDMONDSON (W) • PHIL NOTO (A/C)
    • On a snowy night in Prague, Natasha must fight her way out of disaster alongside the WINTER SOLDIER!
    • Meanwhile, Isaiah has business of his own in London, but a simple plan gets complicated.
    • Nathan Edmonson and Phil Noto continue their uninterrupted run on one of the most acclaimed books of the year.

  4. bevismusson:

    euo:

    myintrovertedmind:

    « The Real Africa : Fight The Stereotype » by Thiri Mariah Boucher

    P.R.E.A.C.H.

    YAS

    Lovely.

    Bloody wish someone had ironed the flags before taking the photos though.

  5. marvel1980s:

Indiana Jones by John Byrne 1981.

    marvel1980s:

    Indiana Jones by John Byrne 1981.

  6. Archie #251, March 1976

    Archie #251, March 1976

  7. hideback:

    Bernard McMahon

    American, 1930’s

  8. Magik
    Art by : Jake Wyatt - Art Adams - Anjin Anhunt - Eric Canete - Jorge Molina -Frazer IrvingJennyson Allan Borlongan Rosero - Chris Bachalo

    (Source: xcyclopswasrightx)

  9. thechronologicalsuperman:

Superman vol.1 #23 - Cover date July-August 1943
Behind a cover depicting an enraged Superman descending upon the terrified crew of a super-imperiled Nazi submarine, this issue chooses to ask the question “Is Superman needed for the war?” Possibly not – his loss to an American armed forces unit during maneuvers seems to indicate that the Allies are in good hands, thanks to our boys serving over there – but he sure is good for putting the fear of a living god into the Axis.
Elsewhere in the same issue, Superman becomes involved in stopping the murderous rampage of a college professor deranged by jealousy, then is pitted against a fashion-world neer-do-well operating under top hat, tuxedo and the amusing nom-du-crime of The Dude.
Lastly, Clark and Lois take in a baseball game where Superman makes repeated appearances. It’s one of those entertaining stories where Clark and Superman must dash about under any number of pretenses to keep Lois’ scrutiny from exposing his increasingly flimsy dual identity.

    thechronologicalsuperman:

    Superman vol.1 #23 - Cover date July-August 1943

    Behind a cover depicting an enraged Superman descending upon the terrified crew of a super-imperiled Nazi submarine, this issue chooses to ask the question “Is Superman needed for the war?” Possibly not – his loss to an American armed forces unit during maneuvers seems to indicate that the Allies are in good hands, thanks to our boys serving over there – but he sure is good for putting the fear of a living god into the Axis.

    Elsewhere in the same issue, Superman becomes involved in stopping the murderous rampage of a college professor deranged by jealousy, then is pitted against a fashion-world neer-do-well operating under top hat, tuxedo and the amusing nom-du-crime of The Dude.

    Lastly, Clark and Lois take in a baseball game where Superman makes repeated appearances. It’s one of those entertaining stories where Clark and Superman must dash about under any number of pretenses to keep Lois’ scrutiny from exposing his increasingly flimsy dual identity.

  10. hevelincollection:

hevvic:

hevelincollection:

From out of the past (Nov-Dec 1938) comes Fantascience Digest, helmed by Robert Madle, Jack Agnew, and John Baltadonis. This amazing hekto cover, replete with ray gun-totin’, Romanesque space man and spaceship blasting death rays, is by John Giunta.The contributors are a roster of early fandom: Moskowitz, Rothman, Conover, Speer, Reinsberg, Warner, and Hart, etc. This particular zine was mailed to Morojo (Myrtle Douglas), one of the most famous of Los Angeles fans and co-editor with Forrest J Ackerman of the zine, Voice of the Imagi-Nation.

Has that been printed on a spirit printer?

Hi, hevvic! No, a hectograph, or jellygraph, is similar to, but different from spirit duplication (1923, Ritzerfeld), also called ditto after the common brand name. Hecto is older, invented in Russia by Mikhail Alisov, 1869. It involves using special pens, pencils, etc. to create a master that is then pressed against gelatin in a pan. Paper can then be pressed against the gelatin to produce copies, usually no more than 40 or 50 decent prints. The results, as seen in early SF and Fantasy zines, can be impressive, particularly the multicolored covers and illustrations that were achieved. Exposure to light was deadly to these hectos as it faded them to illegibility in about a month. The Hevelin Collection contains wonderful examples of hectography, most of it done by young fans in the 1930’s and ‘40’s. I’ll post some more to Hevelin’s Tumblr, soon. 
Want to see hectography in action?  Check out our blog post: 
http://blog.lib.uiowa.edu/speccoll/2013/07/16/what-the-hectograph/

    hevelincollection:

    hevvic:

    hevelincollection:

    From out of the past (Nov-Dec 1938) comes Fantascience Digest, helmed by Robert Madle, Jack Agnew, and John Baltadonis. This amazing hekto cover, replete with ray gun-totin’, Romanesque space man and spaceship blasting death rays, is by John Giunta.The contributors are a roster of early fandom: Moskowitz, Rothman, Conover, Speer, Reinsberg, Warner, and Hart, etc. This particular zine was mailed to Morojo (Myrtle Douglas), one of the most famous of Los Angeles fans and co-editor with Forrest J Ackerman of the zine, Voice of the Imagi-Nation.

    Has that been printed on a spirit printer?

    Hi, hevvic! No, a hectograph, or jellygraph, is similar to, but different from spirit duplication (1923, Ritzerfeld), also called ditto after the common brand name. Hecto is older, invented in Russia by Mikhail Alisov, 1869. It involves using special pens, pencils, etc. to create a master that is then pressed against gelatin in a pan. Paper can then be pressed against the gelatin to produce copies, usually no more than 40 or 50 decent prints. The results, as seen in early SF and Fantasy zines, can be impressive, particularly the multicolored covers and illustrations that were achieved. Exposure to light was deadly to these hectos as it faded them to illegibility in about a month. The Hevelin Collection contains wonderful examples of hectography, most of it done by young fans in the 1930’s and ‘40’s. I’ll post some more to Hevelin’s Tumblr, soon. 

    Want to see hectography in action?  Check out our blog post: 

    http://blog.lib.uiowa.edu/speccoll/2013/07/16/what-the-hectograph/

  11. universalmonsterstribute:

Creature From The Black Lagoon (1954)

    universalmonsterstribute:

    Creature From The Black Lagoon (1954)

  12. phibesaday:

    Modesty Blaise 

  13. danmcdaid:

I have some… questions.

    danmcdaid:

    I have some… questions.

  14. thehappysorceress:

    heatvents:

    This issue just kills me. Every. Damn. Time.

    I am extremely fond of this issue.