1. fantagraphics:

hoppers13:

Jaime Hernandez Love and Rockets #30 “Ninety-Three Million Miles From the Sun” Page 24 Original Art

Jaime

    fantagraphics:

    hoppers13:

    Jaime Hernandez Love and Rockets #30 “Ninety-Three Million Miles From the Sun” Page 24 Original Art

    Jaime

  2. fantagraphics:

we-are-in-it:

Working on my presentation on Xaime Hernandez’s God & Science: Return of the Ti-Girls for NeMLA 2014’s “Can the Sub-altern be Superhero?” panel

Maggie dispenses convention-going wisdom in God & Science

    fantagraphics:

    we-are-in-it:

    Working on my presentation on Xaime Hernandez’s God & Science: Return of the Ti-Girls for NeMLA 2014’s “Can the Sub-altern be Superhero?” panel

    Maggie dispenses convention-going wisdom in God & Science

  3. fantagraphics:

hoppers13:

Jaime Hernandez Chelo’s Burden "100 Rooms" Part 3 Page 16 Original Art

Jaime

    fantagraphics:

    hoppers13:

    Jaime Hernandez Chelo’s Burden "100 Rooms" Part 3 Page 16 Original Art

    Jaime

  4. fantagraphics:

    calamityjon:

    Locas II : Maggie, Hopey & Ray
    Love & Rockets
    Fantagraphics (September, 2009)

    I have a lot of friends who love comics, collect comics, even write about comics and who have never read a single issue of Love & Rockets. It’s a brutally shocking omission - imagine being an aficionado of Westerns and never having seen a John Ford film, or blogging about manga without having ever cracked a single Osamu Tezuka volume - unthinkable, right?

    Love&Rockets represents probably the greatest American work produced within the comics medium ever, but it’s kryptonite to the uninitiated. The most common concern I hear from folks is that there’s so much of it, and I dig - there are literally thirty years of stories which build upon an internal continuity in two distinct storylines from individual authors collected under a single volume, plus ancillary stories which are thematically united but independent from the core storylines, AND both books happily dabble in magical realism, introducing the absurd and unnatural in equal measures with the quotidian and the narrative.  

    BUT trust me, no one expects you to absorb all of that on page one; you just pick a story and start reading - there are excellent guides out there, like Fantagraphics’ “How To Read L&R”, but I honestly feel you could pick up any volume and immerse yourself in that particular arc right from the git-go, the stories are just that appealing.

    And then? Then you’ll have literally thousands of pages of more comics to enjoy. It’ll be like finding an album that blows your mind and then discovering the musician who recorded it produced fifty more, each improvising on its core themes in a new and exciting way…

    Love&Rockets is a comic you owe yourself, particularly if you’ve ever waxed philosophic or raged online about indy titles, creator ownership, auteurship, literate comics for grown-ups, breaking the corporate mold, comics not dependent on franchise, varied and deep depictions of women, strong female characters, representation of the female form, questions of race and identity in comics, gender and sexuality, comics driven on character and relationships rather than spectacle - that’s all in here, and more. 

    There’s more I can tell you to prepare you or try to sway you - the differences in Beto’s and Jaime’s storytelling, the premises of Hoppers and Palomar, where Birdland fits into the whole shmear - or in the best case scenario you can just discover it for yourself…

    Locas II love

  5. fantagraphics:

Jaime, from earlier today.

    fantagraphics:

    Jaime, from earlier today.

  6. funwrecker:

this is so fucking good it kills me every single time.

    funwrecker:

    this is so fucking good it kills me every single time.

  7. thebristolboard:

    Original endpapers by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets trade paperbacks vols. 1-7 and 9, published by Fantagraphics, 1985-1992.

  8. fanzinecoquetelmolotov:

    Love and Rockets!

    Love this. Love every single page of Love & Rockets. In fact I’m pretty sure you could pick any page of L&R at random and post it and it would work perfectly, and yet it’s the overall narrative, chapter by chapter, story by story, that makes both Jaime’s and Gilbert’s works the masterpieces they are.

  9. thebristolboard:

Original cover art by Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets Short Stories, published by Fantagraphics, 1987.

    thebristolboard:

    Original cover art by Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets Short Stories, published by Fantagraphics, 1987.

  10. brianmichaelbendis:

Maggie and Hopey contemplating the ten years of their existence, circa 1992. From “Love and Rockets” by Jaime Hernandez.

    brianmichaelbendis:

    Maggie and Hopey contemplating the ten years of their existence, circa 1992. From “Love and Rockets” by Jaime Hernandez.

    (Source: grilled-up-snakes)

  11. fantagraphics:

    comiccoversgalore:

    Love and Rockets issue 22.

    Front cover by Jaime Hernandez. 

    Back cover by Gilbert Hernandez. 

    Love and Rockets: The Covers is here.

  12. fantagraphics:

Jaime Hernandez Mechanics #2 “On the Road Ag’in Part 2” Page 4 Original Art (Fantagraphics, 1985)

    fantagraphics:

    Jaime Hernandez Mechanics #2 “On the Road Ag’in Part 2” Page 4 Original Art (Fantagraphics, 1985)

  13. fantagraphics:

    Love and Rockets #1 is marvelous. I hope one day to attain the level of the cover drawing myself… it is a perfect drawing.” – Moebius, 1982

    Love and Rockets: The Covers
    by Gilbert, Jaime, and Mario Hernandez

    144-page full-color 10.25” x 13.25” hardcover • $35.00
    ISBN: 978-1-60699-598-3

    Available now! Click the thumbnails for larger versions; get more info, see more previews and pre-order your copy here:

    http://www.fantagraphics.com/lrcovers

  14. ormessociety:

    From the series Love and Rockets from Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez, meet Rocky Rhodes, a young woman with an adventurous heart and an eye for the stars.