1. michaelallanleonard:

Nice to see hipsters will be alive and drinking coffee with ironic detachment well into the future …
Okay, so ‘Hepcats of Venus’ *is* a pretty awesome title.
Lloyd Birmingham, 1962 (by McClaverty)

    michaelallanleonard:

    Nice to see hipsters will be alive and drinking coffee with ironic detachment well into the future …

    Okay, so ‘Hepcats of Venus’ *is* a pretty awesome title.

    Lloyd Birmingham, 1962 (by McClaverty)

  2. americansongwriter:

Various Artists: Dead Man’s Town, A Tribute to Born in the U.S.A
Various Artists
Dead Man’s Town:A Tribute to Born in the U.S.A.(Thirty Tigers)Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
“Born down in a dead man’s town/first kick I took was when I hit the ground/You end up like a dog that’s been beat too much/then you spend half your life trying to cover it up” aren’t exactly the kind of lyrics that scream multi-platinum sales. But add glossy production, thunderous arrangements and Bruce Springsteen’s gruff, boomy vocals and the result was his biggest seller to date, one that moved over 30 million copies worldwide. Coming after the sparse Nebraska, Springsteen’s 1984 release Born in the U.S.A. was an enormous artistic and commercial shift, pushing him into superstar, stadium headliner status. Thirty years later, Columbia/Sony might have missed the boat by not commemorating the event with an expanded box. But that left an opening for this multi-artist tribute with each act taking on one of the 12 tunes, presented in order.
Click here to continue reading

    americansongwriter:

    Various Artists: Dead Man’s Town, A Tribute to Born in the U.S.A

    Various Artists

    Dead Man’s Town:A Tribute to Born in the U.S.A.
    (Thirty Tigers)
    Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    “Born down in a dead man’s town/first kick I took was when I hit the ground/You end up like a dog that’s been beat too much/then you spend half your life trying to cover it up” aren’t exactly the kind of lyrics that scream multi-platinum sales. But add glossy production, thunderous arrangements and Bruce Springsteen’s gruff, boomy vocals and the result was his biggest seller to date, one that moved over 30 million copies worldwide. Coming after the sparse Nebraska, Springsteen’s 1984 release Born in the U.S.A. was an enormous artistic and commercial shift, pushing him into superstar, stadium headliner status. Thirty years later, Columbia/Sony might have missed the boat by not commemorating the event with an expanded box. But that left an opening for this multi-artist tribute with each act taking on one of the 12 tunes, presented in order.

    Click here to continue reading

  3. kickstandkids:

    Real band Married With Sea Monsters recording of “Face It Tiger” by fictional band The Mary Janes.

    Read about them in Edge of Spider-Verse #2 Gwen Stacy: Spider-Woman by Jason Latour, Robbi Rodriguez, and Rico Renzi from Marvel Comics.

  4. turhansbeycompany:

    Really Don’t Care - Vintage Motown - Style Demi Lovato Cover ft. Morgan James

    And when Postmodern Jukebox does a Motown-style cover, you know Tambourine Guy will be there.

  5. suicidewatch:

Creedence Clearwater Revival

    suicidewatch:

    Creedence Clearwater Revival

  6. suicidewatch:

Elvis shopping for records, Memphis 1957.

    suicidewatch:

    Elvis shopping for records, Memphis 1957.

  7. Who is U2? →

  8. seanhowe:

Patti Smith reviews Television at CBGB, 1974: “Robbing you over and over like sex.”Escapees from HeavenPatti SmithSoho Weekly NewsJune 27, 1974
Somewhere in the fifties Billy Lee Riley was slicking brill creme and boys all over the U.S.A. were resting Les Pauls on their hip and scrubbing them like sex. It eats thru the Chez Vous Ballroom 13 Floor Elevator Love Velvet Underground and the Yardbirds live in Persia. It permeates back seats waterfronts the local poolhall traintracks just anywhere that rains adolescents. And for the past six weeks it peaked after midnight every sunday on the bowerie in a dark little soho bar called C.B.G.B. Lousy P.A., long nervous dogs running random, women smoking french cigarettes and mostly boys on the prowl hanging by a thread waiting for Television to tune up. The tune up is their first number. Like a moslem the boys take their time to tune and they don’t apologize. These boys got real short hair totally naked faces and the lead Tom Verlaine has the most beautiful neck in rock ‘n’ roll. Real swan like. The kind of neck you want to strangle. He strolls up to the mike and drawls, “gotta Count Five number for ya” takes a swan dive and the boys launch into Psychotic Reaction. The music is rigidly maniac. A few non-believers murmur that they look like escapees from some mental ward but those tuned into TV know better. These boys are truly escapees from heaven. Television’s wings are a little twisted but the way they play is nearly perfect. Creating infinite space. Throbbing you over and over like sex. And sexy sexy as hell with songs like Hard on love, One on top of another and Love comes in spurts. Confused sexual energy makes young guys so desirable. Their careless way of dressing; their strange way of walking; filled with so much longing. Just relentlessly adolescent. Television is all boy. Richard Lloyd, who trades leads with Verlaine, is fresh and pouty. He sings like Arthur Lee with a stomach ache. The one seeming to suffer the most pain. He plays highly emotional fragile and angry. He also spends a lot of time keeping Richard Hell in tune. Hell raises it. He’s real neat, totally Highway 61. Tufted hair perfect shades and a grey-blue gabardine suit reputed to have graced the frame of Raymond Chandler. The way he moves is so insane like a spastic Chuck Berry like as if he strangest spade was doing the split on desolation row. His bass is total trash. A metallic gold fleck piece of shit he got in some pawnshop for $4. He has a driving monotonous way of playing it that comes on real sexy. He’s also a real fast mouth spits those jokes from the spleen and keeps them coming. Billy Ficca keeps the rhythm always smiling and dreaming. He reminds me of Charlie Watts the way he sits behind the band noncommittal sort of glazed over in his own world just drumming while the other guys are pumping their guitars in furious pursuit of the ultimate orgasm. He has an intricate style best described as psychotic calypso. If he loses his rythumn he invents another one. That way he never makes mistakes he just telescopes. The thing I like about this group is their hunger their desire the way they just get on stage and do it. Immediate tight no flash theatrics. Tom breaks a string he fixes it no apology. Lloyd’s strap slips but he beats into that guitar as it drags to the floor. If Hell loses balance he’ll lay out and play bass flat on his back. No hesitation. Wrong note so what. Television is ascending. Sometimes they drive you crazy cause they get out of time yet so close to persian. But they are worth all temperance cause when they hit it you get shot with light you never felt. They transcend every obstacle and heartache and bad night. Someone said one sunday around 3 a.m. closing time these boys are crazy; they are just too insane but me, I heard this funny flapping of wings, and the wild boys the wild boys the wild boys… just smiled. They’re ascending July 3 to Club 82; July 16 at Max’s Kansas City.

    seanhowe:

    Patti Smith reviews Television at CBGB, 1974: “Robbing you over and over like sex.”

    Escapees from Heaven
    Patti Smith
    Soho Weekly News
    June 27, 1974

    Somewhere in the fifties Billy Lee Riley was slicking brill creme and boys all over the U.S.A. were resting Les Pauls on their hip and scrubbing them like sex. It eats thru the Chez Vous Ballroom 13 Floor Elevator Love Velvet Underground and the Yardbirds live in Persia. It permeates back seats waterfronts the local poolhall traintracks just anywhere that rains adolescents. And for the past six weeks it peaked after midnight every sunday on the bowerie in a dark little soho bar called C.B.G.B. Lousy P.A., long nervous dogs running random, women smoking french cigarettes and mostly boys on the prowl hanging by a thread waiting for Television to tune up.

    The tune up is their first number. Like a moslem the boys take their time to tune and they don’t apologize. These boys got real short hair totally naked faces and the lead Tom Verlaine has the most beautiful neck in rock ‘n’ roll. Real swan like. The kind of neck you want to strangle. He strolls up to the mike and drawls, “gotta Count Five number for ya” takes a swan dive and the boys launch into Psychotic Reaction. The music is rigidly maniac. A few non-believers murmur that they look like escapees from some mental ward but those tuned into TV know better. These boys are truly escapees from heaven.

    Television’s wings are a little twisted but the way they play is nearly perfect. Creating infinite space. Throbbing you over and over like sex. And sexy sexy as hell with songs like Hard on love, One on top of another and Love comes in spurts. Confused sexual energy makes young guys so desirable. Their careless way of dressing; their strange way of walking; filled with so much longing. Just relentlessly adolescent.

    Television is all boy. Richard Lloyd, who trades leads with Verlaine, is fresh and pouty. He sings like Arthur Lee with a stomach ache. The one seeming to suffer the most pain. He plays highly emotional fragile and angry. He also spends a lot of time keeping Richard Hell in tune.

    Hell raises it. He’s real neat, totally Highway 61. Tufted hair perfect shades and a grey-blue gabardine suit reputed to have graced the frame of Raymond Chandler. The way he moves is so insane like a spastic Chuck Berry like as if he strangest spade was doing the split on desolation row. His bass is total trash. A metallic gold fleck piece of shit he got in some pawnshop for $4. He has a driving monotonous way of playing it that comes on real sexy. He’s also a real fast mouth spits those jokes from the spleen and keeps them coming.

    Billy Ficca keeps the rhythm always smiling and dreaming. He reminds me of Charlie Watts the way he sits behind the band noncommittal sort of glazed over in his own world just drumming while the other guys are pumping their guitars in furious pursuit of the ultimate orgasm. He has an intricate style best described as psychotic calypso. If he loses his rythumn he invents another one. That way he never makes mistakes he just telescopes.

    The thing I like about this group is their hunger their desire the way they just get on stage and do it. Immediate tight no flash theatrics. Tom breaks a string he fixes it no apology. Lloyd’s strap slips but he beats into that guitar as it drags to the floor. If Hell loses balance he’ll lay out and play bass flat on his back. No hesitation. Wrong note so what.

    Television is ascending. Sometimes they drive you crazy cause they get out of time yet so close to persian. But they are worth all temperance cause when they hit it you get shot with light you never felt. They transcend every obstacle and heartache and bad night. Someone said one sunday around 3 a.m. closing time these boys are crazy; they are just too insane but me, I heard this funny flapping of wings, and the wild boys the wild boys the wild boys… just smiled. They’re ascending July 3 to Club 82; July 16 at Max’s Kansas City.

  9. i12bent:

    Steve Kilbey is 60 today - unreal! I liked this very much 30 years ago…

    The Church: Almost With You - from The Blurred Crusade, 1982

    (via pnksqrs)

  10. behindthegrooves:

    On this day in music history: September 12, 1970 - The animated cartoon series “Josie And The Pussycats” makes its network broadcast debut on CBS. Produced by Hanna-Barbera, the series based on the Archies comic characters (created by Dan DeCarlo) about an all girl pop music band and their misadventures features Cheryl Ladd (billed as Cherie Moor) and Patrice Holloway (sister of Motown vocalist Brenda Holloway) as the singing voices of Melody and Valerie. The series is the first to feature an African American character on a Saturday morning cartoon show. Initally, Hanna-Barbera had revamped the character of Valerie to make her white. When music supervisor Danny Janssen refuses to replace Patrice Holloway and threatens to quit the project, there will be a three week stand off between Janssen and the shows producers. They will eventually relent and allow Valerie to remain as she was originally conceived. The series is an immediate hit, and the original sixteen episodes will run in syndication for many years after its network run, also spinning off a second series titled “Josie and the Pussycats in Outer Space” in September of 1972. Janssen will also produce an album and several singles released under the Josie And The Pussycats name (released by Capitol Records) late 1970 and 1971. The records will sell poorly, but will later become heavily sought after by fans of the show. In 2001, Rhino Handmade will issue a CD consisting the group’s lone album plus singles (two commercially released and four available as mail order items through Kellogg’s) and alternate mixes of tracks. The set is limited to only 5,000 copies and sells out almost immediately. The complete original series will be released on DVD in 2007.

  11. kevincannonart:

In honor of the big Replacements show on Saturday, my friend Pat Ganley and I whipped up this map of the Mats’ beginnings in Minneapolis in the early 1980s. Click to read the high-res version.

    kevincannonart:

    In honor of the big Replacements show on Saturday, my friend Pat Ganley and I whipped up this map of the Mats’ beginnings in Minneapolis in the early 1980s. Click to read the high-res version.

  12. alexsegura:

    The Replacements play “Alex Chilton” on @jimmyfallon. YES.

  13. turhansbeycompany:

    Problem - Vintage ’50s Doo-Wop Ariana Grande Cover ft. The Tee - Tones

    I do so love when Postmodern Jukebox brings in the Tee Tones.

  14. suicidewatch:

    Bruce Springsteen on stage with Robert Gordon and Link Wray.

  15. radremedies:

+ JOHN FOGERTY +

    radremedies:

    + JOHN FOGERTY +