1. jellobiafrasays:

the big sleep (1976 ed.)

    jellobiafrasays:

    the big sleep (1976 ed.)

  2. 
Robert Mitchum photographed by Ronny Jacques, c. 1947.

    Robert Mitchum photographed by Ronny Jacques, c. 1947.

    (Source: robert-mitchum)

  3. "It’s a hard world for little things."

    #60 - The Night of the Hunter
    USA | 1955

  4. haroldlloyds:

    NOIRVEMBER DAY 25 - Out of the Past (1947) dir. Jacques Tourneur

  5. mykindofimages:

    Out of the Past (1947). Directed by Jacques Tourneur.

  6. noirbynight:

"I never saw her int the daytime.  We seemed to live by night.  What was left of the day went away like a pack of cigarettes you smoked.  I didn’t know where she lived.  I didn’t follow her.  All I ever had to go on was a place and a time to see her again.  I don’t know what we were waiting for. Maybe we thought the world would end."
Jeff Bailey (Robert Mitchum) in Out Of The Past (1947).
source: fragmentsofnoir.blogspot.com

    noirbynight:

    "I never saw her int the daytime.  We seemed to live by night.  What was left of the day went away like a pack of cigarettes you smoked.  I didn’t know where she lived.  I didn’t follow her.  All I ever had to go on was a place and a time to see her again.  I don’t know what we were waiting for. Maybe we thought the world would end."

    Jeff Bailey (Robert Mitchum) in Out Of The Past (1947).

    source: fragmentsofnoir.blogspot.com

  7. blacklightnoir:

Robert Mitchum in Out of the Past Dir. by Jacques Tourneur1947

    blacklightnoir:

    Robert Mitchum
    in Out of the Past
    Dir. by Jacques Tourneur
    1947

    (Source: williemckay)

  8. haroldlloyds:

    NOIRVEMBER DAY 25 - Out of the Past (1947) dir. Jacques Tourneur

  9. thefuturistiswriting:

SEE YOU NOIR WEDNESDAY!
FAREWELL, MY LOVELY (1975, Dick Richards)
*Remember … it’s NOIRvember

    thefuturistiswriting:

    SEE YOU NOIR WEDNESDAY!

    FAREWELL, MY LOVELY (1975, Dick Richards)

    *Remember … it’s NOIRvember

  10. thefuturistiswriting:

SEE YOU NOIR WEDNESDAY!
THE BIG SLEEP (1978, Michael Winner)
*it’s NOIRvember

    thefuturistiswriting:

    SEE YOU NOIR WEDNESDAY!

    THE BIG SLEEP (1978, Michael Winner)

    *it’s NOIRvember

  11. iantofish-bowiespider:

    Noirvember 2013 - Day 13

    Out of the Past (1947) dir. Jacques Tourneur

    ↳ You’re like a leaf that blows from one gutter to another.’

    (Source: octopus-hamlet)

  12. popculturehypnotizedmycat:

    Shots from the ultimate “Film Noir” piece, “Out Of the Past” with Jane Greer and Robert Mitchum (1947).

    (Source: canadianbeerandpostmodernism)

  13. 
Inflamed by Howard Hughes’ fetishist dictates concerning Jean Simmons’ hairstyle, Simmons had abruptly taken a pair of shears and hacked off her rich dark locks till what remained was a variation on the hairdo worn by Stooge Moe Howard.  Wigs had to be quickly prepared to disguise the damage.  
Speculation as to just what sort of treatment Hughes had instructed Otto Preminger to give Miss Simmons was fueled by the director’s gratuitously brutal behavior toward the actress.  “He absolutely, totally destroyed me,” Simmons would remember.  Shooting a scene at the studio, they reached a moment early in the script that required Mitchum to slap Simmons on the face.  Mitchum effectively faked the blow, barely grazing the actress’s cheek.  Preminger, standing just behind him, screamed, “No, no!” The camera was tight on her face, too close for such fakery, said the director.  “Slap her for real!”  Mitchum tried again.  Preminger didn’t care for it.  “Again!”  SImmons braced herself, her cheek already flaring.  The camera rolled; Mitchum slapped here.  “No good!  Do it again!”  
Jean Simmons’ eyes began to water from the impact.  Mitchum thought she was crying.  “Oh Christ,” he muttered.  
"Vunce more!"  Preminger barked.  Mitchum slapped her again. 
 “Vunce more!” 
 Mitchum spun around.  “Once more?” he said and either slapped Preminger across the face, with just the force the director had been asking for, or very nearly did the same.  Preminger scurried away.  He demanded that Mitchum be replaced.  He was told to go back and finish the picture before Jean decided to cut her nose off.

    Inflamed by Howard Hughes’ fetishist dictates concerning Jean Simmons’ hairstyle, Simmons had abruptly taken a pair of shears and hacked off her rich dark locks till what remained was a variation on the hairdo worn by Stooge Moe Howard.  Wigs had to be quickly prepared to disguise the damage. 

    Speculation as to just what sort of treatment Hughes had instructed Otto Preminger to give Miss Simmons was fueled by the director’s gratuitously brutal behavior toward the actress.  “He absolutely, totally destroyed me,” Simmons would remember.  Shooting a scene at the studio, they reached a moment early in the script that required Mitchum to slap Simmons on the face.  Mitchum effectively faked the blow, barely grazing the actress’s cheek.  Preminger, standing just behind him, screamed, “No, no!” The camera was tight on her face, too close for such fakery, said the director.  “Slap her for real!”  Mitchum tried again.  Preminger didn’t care for it.  “Again!”  SImmons braced herself, her cheek already flaring.  The camera rolled; Mitchum slapped here.  “No good!  Do it again!” 

    Jean Simmons’ eyes began to water from the impact.  Mitchum thought she was crying.  “Oh Christ,” he muttered. 

    "Vunce more!"  Preminger barked.  Mitchum slapped her again. 

    “Vunce more!” 

    Mitchum spun around.  “Once more?” he said and either slapped Preminger across the face, with just the force the director had been asking for, or very nearly did the same.  Preminger scurried away.  He demanded that Mitchum be replaced.  He was told to go back and finish the picture before Jean decided to cut her nose off.

    (Source: robert-mitchum)

  14. seanwicks:

    Noirvember

    OUT OF THE PAST (1947)

    RKO Radio Pictures / 97 minutes / Directed by: Jacques Tourneur

    I never saw her in the daytime. We seemed to live by night. What was left of the day went away like a pack of cigarettes you smoked. I didn’t know where she lived. I never followed her. All I ever had to go on was a place and time to see her again. I don’t know what we were waiting for. Maybe we thought the world would end.”

    A Film Noir a day for the month of November

  15. memoriastoica:

The Night Of The Hunter

    memoriastoica:

    The Night Of The Hunter