1. awyeahcomics:

The Spirit by Darwyn Cooke

    awyeahcomics:

    The Spirit by Darwyn Cooke

  2. cooketimm:

The Spirit / The Rocketeer #1-2 connected covers by Darwyn Cooke & J. Bone

    cooketimm:

    The Spirit / The Rocketeer #1-2 connected covers by Darwyn Cooke & J. Bone

  3. thebristolboard:

    Highlights from the third Amazing Heroes Swimsuit Special, published by Fantagraphics, June 1992.

  4. cooketimm:

The Spirit by Darwyn Cooke

    cooketimm:

    The Spirit by Darwyn Cooke

  5. comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 2010: The Spirit #1
Sienkiewicz returns to the Spirit for an eight-page backup story for its 2010 relaunch.

    comicartistevolution:

    Bill Sienkiewicz 2010: The Spirit #1

    Sienkiewicz returns to the Spirit for an eight-page backup story for its 2010 relaunch.

  6. Had to post this after posting that.
(And yeah note: this is also the Chicago edition!)

    Had to post this after posting that.
    (And yeah note: this is also the Chicago edition!)

  7. thehappysorceress:

The Spirit by Denis Bodart, inks by Ben Basso

This is remarkably close to the format of the P.I./client diptych commissions I’m currently having done (of which, more to come next week. You’ll be surprised. Or not).

    thehappysorceress:

    The Spirit by Denis Bodart, inks by Ben Basso

    This is remarkably close to the format of the P.I./client diptych commissions I’m currently having done (of which, more to come next week. You’ll be surprised. Or not).

  8. thecomicsvault:

    When Will Eisner was discharged from the Army in 1945, he returned to his creation - THE SPIRIT.
    He pushed the comic towards it’s artistic peak and experimented with the form and content. An example is this cutaway of a house, where each scene in each room pushes the story to it’s climax at the ground floor.

    THE SPIRIT #347 (Jan. 19, 1947)
    "The School For Girls"
    By Will Eisner

  9. ronsalas:

Drew this after the atrocity that was the Spirit movie. #tbt

    ronsalas:

    Drew this after the atrocity that was the Spirit movie. #tbt

  10. brudesworld:

Will Eisner and Ken Kelly, 1975

    brudesworld:

    Will Eisner and Ken Kelly, 1975

  11. brianmichaelbendis:

    Signed, limited edition print set of the covers from The Spirit: The New Adventures #1-4 by Will Eisner with Dave Gibbons (#1), Mark Schultz (#2), Brian Bolland (#3), and William Stout (#4), published by Kitchen Sink Press, March - June, 1998. 

    (Source: thebristolboard)

  12. brianmichaelbendis:

The Spirit poster by Will Eisner, published by Collector’s Press, 1977.

    brianmichaelbendis:

    The Spirit poster by Will Eisner, published by Collector’s Press, 1977.

    (Source: thebristolboard)

  13. brevoorthistoryofcomics:


THE SPIRIT #17 Winter, 1977 
The first Spirit story I read was the one reprinted in THE GREAT COMIC BOOK HEROES, and frankly, I didn’t see what all the fuss was about. But I’d heard more about the character and his mileau in THE COMIC- BOOK BOOK, and thought it sounded intriguing. So when the SUPERHERO MERCHANDISE catalog (the mail-order firm that ultimately evolved into HEROES WORLD) offered the first two issues of Kitchen Sink’s reprintings of the strip (the numbering carried over from the Warren run of reprints), I took a leap and ordered the both of them. 
Will Eisner’s SPIRIT is a seminal comics experience. In just seven pages, Eisner would craft tales of startling power and sensitivity, little mini-movies that ran the gamut of human emotions and experiences. It was a rewarding, fully-rounded series, done originally as a newspaper insert which allowed Eisner to play towards a broader audience than the young children then thought to be the only audience for comic books. 
You owe it to yourself to seek some of these stories out. 
I can remember bringing this issue of THE SPIRIT into my sixth grade class, to use as an example of the short story format. The teacher actually read two Spirit stories to the class.

    brevoorthistoryofcomics:

    THE SPIRIT #17
    Winter, 1977

    The first Spirit story I read was the one reprinted in THE GREAT COMIC BOOK HEROES, and frankly, I didn’t see what all the fuss was about. But I’d heard more about the character and his mileau in THE COMIC- BOOK BOOK, and thought it sounded intriguing. So when the SUPERHERO MERCHANDISE catalog (the mail-order firm that ultimately evolved into HEROES WORLD) offered the first two issues of Kitchen Sink’s reprintings of the strip (the numbering carried over from the Warren run of reprints), I took a leap and ordered the both of them.

    Will Eisner’s SPIRIT is a seminal comics experience. In just seven pages, Eisner would craft tales of startling power and sensitivity, little mini-movies that ran the gamut of human emotions and experiences. It was a rewarding, fully-rounded series, done originally as a newspaper insert which allowed Eisner to play towards a broader audience than the young children then thought to be the only audience for comic books.

    You owe it to yourself to seek some of these stories out.

    I can remember bringing this issue of THE SPIRIT into my sixth grade class, to use as an example of the short story format. The teacher actually read two Spirit stories to the class.

  14. 9emeart:

Il pleut !
Eisner

    9emeart:

    Il pleut !

    Eisner

  15. jsarevisited:

alternateworldcomics:

Will Eisner’s the Spirit and Ellen Dolan.

    jsarevisited:

    alternateworldcomics:

    Will Eisner’s the Spirit and Ellen Dolan.