1. rexparker:

"She’s a charming middle-aged lady with a face like a bucket of mud and if she has washed her hair since Coolidge’s second term, I’ll eat my spare tire, rim and all."

    rexparker:

    "She’s a charming middle-aged lady with a face like a bucket of mud and if she has washed her hair since Coolidge’s second term, I’ll eat my spare tire, rim and all."

  2. More from this Chandler collection.

  3. Awesome Chandler collection on IMGUR. Check the link to see more - and I do mean more. Quoting the poster :

    My Chandler collection consists of over 300 items, which I will describe in this album of 115 images. Included are first American and first British editions, vintage paperbacks, foreign editions, magazine appearances, various reprints, limited editions, uncorrected proofs, movie/television related items, reference works and ephemera. A few of the highlights in my collection, beyond first edition copies of all seven Philip Marlowe novels, include a complete set of Swedish first editions, a complete set of early Penguin paperbacks, a 1908 copy of The Chambers’s Journal which contains Chandler’s first published work, a 1949 issue of Cosmopolitan Magazine which contains the first appearance of The Little Sister, two British Fingerprint editions signed by Chandler’s agent and fiance Helga Greene, and an Arion Press edition of The Big Sleep.

  4. sunsetgun:

The nicest neighbor they’ve ever had.

    sunsetgun:

    The nicest neighbor they’ve ever had.

  5. vintageanchorbooks:

    The Raymond Chandler Map of Los Angeles

  6. vonmurr:

Raymond Chandler The Simple Art of Murder cover by Artzybasheff [via Sotheby’s]

    vonmurr:

    Raymond Chandler The Simple Art of Murder cover by Artzybasheff [via Sotheby’s]

  7. gentlemanlosergentlemanjunkie:

    Three paperback covers for Raymond Chandler’s (The) Finger Man, 1940s.

    (via Davy Crockett’s Almanack of Mystery, Adventure and The Wild West: Overlooked Films: PHILIP MARLOWE, PRIVATE EYE in “Finger Man”)

  8. gentlemanlosergentlemanjunkie:

Black Mask, October 1934; cover art by Fred Craft.

 (via Davy Crockett’s Almanack of Mystery, Adventure and The Wild West: Overlooked Films: PHILIP MARLOWE, PRIVATE EYE in “Finger Man”)

    gentlemanlosergentlemanjunkie:

    Black Mask, October 1934; cover art by Fred Craft.

    (via Davy Crockett’s Almanack of Mystery, Adventure and The Wild West: Overlooked Films: PHILIP MARLOWE, PRIVATE EYE in “Finger Man”)

  9. downthesemeanstreetspodcast:

    Humphrey Bogart (as Philip Marlowe) and Lauren Bacall (as Vivian Regan) stymie the cops in this scene from The Big Sleep. Audiences were never frustrated, however, when the couple teamed up on screen.

  10. Chandler wrote like a slumming angel and invested the sun-blinded streets of Los Angeles with a romantic presence.

    — Ross Macdonald (via vintagecrimeblacklizard)

  11. dispatchesfromnoir:

I recently lamented the lack of recent Marlowes.  Well, The dearth was not so dire as I thought.  Since then, I stumbled upon this Japanese adaptation of The Long Goodbye from earlier this year.  
The five-hour miniseries is quite good, and very faithful to Chandler’s novel.  The addition of a milquetoasty reporter as a sidekick and third-person narrator is a bit clunky at times.  Why not just use first-person narration?  But Tadanobu Asano is excellent as Marlowe, here renamed Banji Masuzawa.  Asana strikes all the right notes as a detached, stubborn private detective.  The miniseries is set in postwar Tokyo (which bore a passing resemblance to Blade Runner, evidently), and the postwar Japanese context is woven through Chandler’s plot in an intriguing fashion.  Don’t expect a film noir aesthetic à la Dick Powell or Humphrey Bogart, but this Long Goodbye is a sumptuous period piece that doesn’t lack for good production values.  More importantly, noir fatalism (sorry, Penzler, Raymond Chandler is noir) was explicit and implicit throughout the series.
I don’t speak Japanese, so I’m not sure how closely the dialogue matches Chandler’s tough-guy prose.  The subtitles were not Chandler-level material—but what is?  I’m not sure if Chandler’s telegraphic prose would make sense in Japanese anyhow.  
All in all, a worthy Marlowe adaptation.  

Adding this to my must-find list.

    dispatchesfromnoir:

    I recently lamented the lack of recent Marlowes.  Well, The dearth was not so dire as I thought.  Since then, I stumbled upon this Japanese adaptation of The Long Goodbye from earlier this year.  

    The five-hour miniseries is quite good, and very faithful to Chandler’s novel.  The addition of a milquetoasty reporter as a sidekick and third-person narrator is a bit clunky at times.  Why not just use first-person narration?  But Tadanobu Asano is excellent as Marlowe, here renamed Banji Masuzawa.  Asana strikes all the right notes as a detached, stubborn private detective.  The miniseries is set in postwar Tokyo (which bore a passing resemblance to Blade Runner, evidently), and the postwar Japanese context is woven through Chandler’s plot in an intriguing fashion.  Don’t expect a film noir aesthetic à la Dick Powell or Humphrey Bogart, but this Long Goodbye is a sumptuous period piece that doesn’t lack for good production values.  More importantly, noir fatalism (sorry, Penzler, Raymond Chandler is noir) was explicit and implicit throughout the series.

    I don’t speak Japanese, so I’m not sure how closely the dialogue matches Chandler’s tough-guy prose.  The subtitles were not Chandler-level material—but what is?  I’m not sure if Chandler’s telegraphic prose would make sense in Japanese anyhow.  

    All in all, a worthy Marlowe adaptation.  

    Adding this to my must-find list.

  12. sweetheartsandcharacters:

    ACTORS WHO HAVE PLAYED PHILIP MARLOWE: Dick Powell in Murder, My Sweet (1944), Humphrey Bogart in The Big Sleep (1946), Robert Montgomery in Lady in the Lake (1947), George Montgomery in The Brasher Doubloon (1947), Philip Carey in the TV show (1959-60), James Garner in Marlowe (1969), Elliott Gould in The Long Goodbye (1973), Robert Mitchum in Farewell, My Lovely (1975), Powers Boothe in another TV show (1983-86) and James Caan in Poodle Springs (1998).

    (Sources: www.prettycleverfilms.com/ www.murrayewing.co.uk/ www.soundonsight.org/ www.tvclasica.com/ www.garnerphile.blogspot.com/ www.jake-weird.blogspot.fr/ www.thetimes.co.uk/ www.permissiontokill.com/ www.tvspielfilm.de)

  13. chrissamnee:

Howard the Duck. 
Pretty sure he’s Elliot Gould’s spirit animal. 
At least in The Long Goodbye.

    chrissamnee:

    Howard the Duck.
    Pretty sure he’s Elliot Gould’s spirit animal.
    At least in The Long Goodbye.