1. Chandler wrote like a slumming angel and invested the sun-blinded streets of Los Angeles with a romantic presence.

    — Ross Macdonald (via vintagecrimeblacklizard)

  2. dispatchesfromnoir:

I recently lamented the lack of recent Marlowes.  Well, The dearth was not so dire as I thought.  Since then, I stumbled upon this Japanese adaptation of The Long Goodbye from earlier this year.  
The five-hour miniseries is quite good, and very faithful to Chandler’s novel.  The addition of a milquetoasty reporter as a sidekick and third-person narrator is a bit clunky at times.  Why not just use first-person narration?  But Tadanobu Asano is excellent as Marlowe, here renamed Banji Masuzawa.  Asana strikes all the right notes as a detached, stubborn private detective.  The miniseries is set in postwar Tokyo (which bore a passing resemblance to Blade Runner, evidently), and the postwar Japanese context is woven through Chandler’s plot in an intriguing fashion.  Don’t expect a film noir aesthetic à la Dick Powell or Humphrey Bogart, but this Long Goodbye is a sumptuous period piece that doesn’t lack for good production values.  More importantly, noir fatalism (sorry, Penzler, Raymond Chandler is noir) was explicit and implicit throughout the series.
I don’t speak Japanese, so I’m not sure how closely the dialogue matches Chandler’s tough-guy prose.  The subtitles were not Chandler-level material—but what is?  I’m not sure if Chandler’s telegraphic prose would make sense in Japanese anyhow.  
All in all, a worthy Marlowe adaptation.  

Adding this to my must-find list.

    dispatchesfromnoir:

    I recently lamented the lack of recent Marlowes.  Well, The dearth was not so dire as I thought.  Since then, I stumbled upon this Japanese adaptation of The Long Goodbye from earlier this year.  

    The five-hour miniseries is quite good, and very faithful to Chandler’s novel.  The addition of a milquetoasty reporter as a sidekick and third-person narrator is a bit clunky at times.  Why not just use first-person narration?  But Tadanobu Asano is excellent as Marlowe, here renamed Banji Masuzawa.  Asana strikes all the right notes as a detached, stubborn private detective.  The miniseries is set in postwar Tokyo (which bore a passing resemblance to Blade Runner, evidently), and the postwar Japanese context is woven through Chandler’s plot in an intriguing fashion.  Don’t expect a film noir aesthetic à la Dick Powell or Humphrey Bogart, but this Long Goodbye is a sumptuous period piece that doesn’t lack for good production values.  More importantly, noir fatalism (sorry, Penzler, Raymond Chandler is noir) was explicit and implicit throughout the series.

    I don’t speak Japanese, so I’m not sure how closely the dialogue matches Chandler’s tough-guy prose.  The subtitles were not Chandler-level material—but what is?  I’m not sure if Chandler’s telegraphic prose would make sense in Japanese anyhow.  

    All in all, a worthy Marlowe adaptation.  

    Adding this to my must-find list.

  3. sweetheartsandcharacters:

    ACTORS WHO HAVE PLAYED PHILIP MARLOWE: Dick Powell in Murder, My Sweet (1944), Humphrey Bogart in The Big Sleep (1946), Robert Montgomery in Lady in the Lake (1947), George Montgomery in The Brasher Doubloon (1947), Philip Carey in the TV show (1959-60), James Garner in Marlowe (1969), Elliott Gould in The Long Goodbye (1973), Robert Mitchum in Farewell, My Lovely (1975), Powers Boothe in another TV show (1983-86) and James Caan in Poodle Springs (1998).

    (Sources: www.prettycleverfilms.com/ www.murrayewing.co.uk/ www.soundonsight.org/ www.tvclasica.com/ www.garnerphile.blogspot.com/ www.jake-weird.blogspot.fr/ www.thetimes.co.uk/ www.permissiontokill.com/ www.tvspielfilm.de)

  4. chrissamnee:

Howard the Duck. 
Pretty sure he’s Elliot Gould’s spirit animal. 
At least in The Long Goodbye.

    chrissamnee:

    Howard the Duck.
    Pretty sure he’s Elliot Gould’s spirit animal.
    At least in The Long Goodbye.

  5. The corrective to wickedness in both novels is not a bruised, melancholy individualism, but connection, loyalty, trust. And what all of these novels assert, over and over again, is that wounded people can do just that. It’s not just the streets that are mean. Women and girls are more familiar with the business end of the human capacity for cruelty and evil than Chandler’s old-fashioned man of honor would ever suspect; so many become acquainted with it at a tender age. But they are also tougher and more dangerous than he’d suspect as well. Tough enough to recognize that walking down those mean streets alone is the coward’s way out. Far greater challenges await within.

    — Why today’s most exciting crime novelists are women - Salon.com (via rachelfershleiser)

    Interesting thoughts about the archetypal P.I. figure. Let me quote some more, and then go read the whole thing:

    Chandler wrote that his hero was a “lonely man” and that the author did “not care much about his private life.” As a rule, he barely has one. A descendant of the lone gunslinger or embattled frontier sheriff, the hardboiled P.I. is a solitary, wandering soul, roving from mansions to dives in search of the truth. Like the western, the traditional noir detective story is preoccupied with how a hero can be constituted in a corrupt world. Usually it’s by holding himself apart from others. John Wayne’s character in “The Searchers” values and defends what he sees as the moral, domestic lives of white settlers, but he has encountered too much barbarism beyond civilization’s edges to enjoy such a life himself. He’s damaged, which pretty much lets him off the hook for the sticky work of actually connecting to and accommodating another human being, while still allowing him to feel sorry for himself.
    Food for thought.

  6. The Philip Marlowe boardgame tie-in to the 1959-1960 ABC series.
Also see the Honey West boardgame.

    The Philip Marlowe boardgame tie-in to the 1959-1960 ABC series.

    Also see the Honey West boardgame.

  7. seattlemysterybooks:

notpulpcovers:

Verdict
Issue: 1 / June 1953

June 1953 issue
stories included:
Rex Stout, Fer-de-Lance, part 1 of 4 (Nero Wolfe & Archie Goodwin)
Craig Rice, His Heart Could Break (John J. Malone)
Dan Sontup, “Tricks of the Trade: Fingerprints [column]
Henry Kane, “A Glass of Milk” (Peter Chambers)
Steve Fischer, “Goodbye Hannah”
Chester B. Himes, “Marihuana and a Pistol”
Fredric Brown, “Don’t Look Behind You”
Edward Clark, “Crime Firsts: The La Rosa Case” (column)
Raymond Chandler, “Trouble is My Business” (John Dalmas)
all reprints from other publications
Seattle Mystery Bookshop

    seattlemysterybooks:

    notpulpcovers:

    Verdict

    Issue: 1 / June 1953

    June 1953 issue

    stories included:

    Rex Stout, Fer-de-Lance, part 1 of 4 (Nero Wolfe & Archie Goodwin)

    Craig Rice, His Heart Could Break (John J. Malone)

    Dan Sontup, “Tricks of the Trade: Fingerprints [column]

    Henry Kane, “A Glass of Milk” (Peter Chambers)

    Steve Fischer, “Goodbye Hannah”

    Chester B. Himes, “Marihuana and a Pistol”

    Fredric Brown, “Don’t Look Behind You”

    Edward Clark, “Crime Firsts: The La Rosa Case” (column)

    Raymond Chandler, “Trouble is My Business” (John Dalmas)

    all reprints from other publications

    Seattle Mystery Bookshop

  8. Chandler wrote the kind of guy that he wanted to be, Hammett wrote the kind of guy that he was afraid he was.

    — james ellroy (via guerreotype)

  9. turhansbeycompany:

pulpfrog:

Dime Detective - August, 1939

Well. Women in refrigerators coincidentally date to the earliest years of superheroes.

    turhansbeycompany:

    pulpfrog:

    Dime Detective - August, 1939

    Well. Women in refrigerators coincidentally date to the earliest years of superheroes.

  10. Black Mask, October 1934

    Black Mask, October 1934

  11. New Episode on Sunday - Philip Marlowe

    downthesemeanstreetspodcast:

    image

    On the next episode of “Down These Mean Streets,” we salute Raymond Chandler with a belated birthday tribute. In honor of the legendary writer, we’ll catch up with his private detective, Philip Marlowe. We’ll hear Marlowe take on two of his toughest radio cases in “The Dancing Hands” (originally aired on CBS on March 19, 1949) and “The Glass Donkey” (originally aired on CBS on July 28, 1950). Listen as Marlowe proves once again that crime doesn’t pay in Episode 68 - Gutter, Prison, or Grave, available Sunday, July 27th!

    Click here to subscribe to the “Down These Mean Streets” podcast in iTunes.

    And, in case you missed it, click here for last week’s episode featuring The Man Called X.

  12. seattlemysterybooks:

gentlemanlosergentlemanjunkie:

Dime Detective Magazine, March 1938.
(via Rough Edges: Sunday Morning Bonus Pulp: Dime Detective, March 1938)

stories included:
Carroll John Daly, “A Corpse on the House” (Race Williams)
Raymond Chandler, “The King in Yellow” (Steve Grace, housedick) - first appearance of this story, one often reprinted
Frederick C. Davis, “Crimson Broadcast” (Keyhole Kerry)
William Edward Hayes, “Death by Enlargement”
Maxwell Hawkins, “Rx Murder”
Seattle Mystery Bookshop

    seattlemysterybooks:

    gentlemanlosergentlemanjunkie:

    Dime Detective Magazine, March 1938.

    (via Rough Edges: Sunday Morning Bonus Pulp: Dime Detective, March 1938)


    stories included:

    Carroll John Daly, “A Corpse on the House” (Race Williams)

    Raymond Chandler, “The King in Yellow” (Steve Grace, housedick) - first appearance of this story, one often reprinted

    Frederick C. Davis, “Crimson Broadcast” (Keyhole Kerry)

    William Edward Hayes, “Death by Enlargement”

    Maxwell Hawkins, “Rx Murder”

    Seattle Mystery Bookshop