1. tylerweaver:

The Big Sleep, 1958 Pocket Books edition, cover art by Ernest Chiriaka (AKA Darcy)

    tylerweaver:

    The Big Sleep, 1958 Pocket Books edition, cover art by Ernest Chiriaka (AKA Darcy)

  2. vintageanchorbooks:

"He wasn’t just big. He was a giant. He looked seven feet high, and he wore the loudest clothes I ever saw on a really big man. Pleated maroon pants, a rough grayish coat with white billiard balls for buttons, brown suede shoes with explosions in white kid on them, a brown shirt, a yellow tie, a large red carnation, and a front-door handkerchief the color of the Irish flag. It was neatly arranged in three points, under the red carnation. On Central Avenue, not the quietest dressed street in the world, with that size and that make-up he looked about as unobtrusive as a tarantula on a slice of angel food.” —from “Try the Girl” (1937), by Raymond Chandler An unstoppable anthology of crime stories culled from Black Mask magazine the legendary publication that turned a pulp phenomenon into literary mainstream. Black Mask was the apotheosis of noir. It was the magazine where the first hardboiled detective story, which was written by Carroll John Daly appeared. It was the slum in which such American literary titans like Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler got their start, and it was the home of stories with titles like “Murder Is Bad Luck,” “Ten Carets of Lead,” and “Drop Dead Twice.” Collected here is best of the best, the hardest of the hardboiled, and the darkest of the dark of America’s finest crime fiction. Including Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon as it was originally published.

    vintageanchorbooks:

    "He wasn’t just big. He was a giant. He looked seven feet high, and he wore the loudest clothes I ever saw on a really big man.
    Pleated maroon pants, a rough grayish coat with white billiard balls for buttons, brown suede shoes with explosions in white kid on them, a brown shirt, a yellow tie, a large red carnation, and a front-door handkerchief the color of the Irish flag. It was neatly arranged in three points, under the red carnation. On Central Avenue, not the quietest dressed street in the world, with that size and that make-up he looked about as unobtrusive as a tarantula on a slice of angel food.”
    —from “Try the Girl” (1937), by Raymond Chandler

    An unstoppable anthology of crime stories culled from Black Mask magazine the legendary publication that turned a pulp phenomenon into literary mainstream. Black Mask was the apotheosis of noir. It was the magazine where the first hardboiled detective story, which was written by Carroll John Daly appeared. It was the slum in which such American literary titans like Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler got their start, and it was the home of stories with titles like “Murder Is Bad Luck,” “Ten Carets of Lead,” and “Drop Dead Twice.” Collected here is best of the best, the hardest of the hardboiled, and the darkest of the dark of America’s finest crime fiction. Including Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon as it was originally published.

  3. remotecontrolledquicksand:

Rejected Long Goodbye poster by Richard Amsel. Replaced by the great Jack Davis but I think this one gets the vibe down a little better, [Source]

    remotecontrolledquicksand:

    Rejected Long Goodbye poster by Richard Amsel. Replaced by the great Jack Davis but I think this one gets the vibe down a little better, [Source]

  4. screengoddess:

Nancy Guild 1947 - The Brasher Doubloon

    screengoddess:

    Nancy Guild 1947 - The Brasher Doubloon

  5. jellobiafrasays:

the big sleep (1976 ed.)

    jellobiafrasays:

    the big sleep (1976 ed.)

  6. chri5:

Wonderful poster art for  Howard Hawks’, “The Big Sleep” that I have never seen before. I found it in the image section of the fairly recent Raymond Chandler biography by Tom Williams “The Life of Raymond Chandler”. I just had to hunt this down and post it because of its beauty. 

    chri5:

    Wonderful poster art for  Howard Hawks’, “The Big Sleep” that I have never seen before. I found it in the image section of the fairly recent Raymond Chandler biography by Tom Williams “The Life of Raymond Chandler”. I just had to hunt this down and post it because of its beauty. 

  7. universitybookstore:

    The Many Faces (and Book Covers) of Philip Marlowe


    No genre stirs the imagination quite like Noir with its inky shadows, rain-slicked streets, hard-boiled detectives, and tough guy thugs. And no writer shaped the noir narrative more than Raymond Chandler. His crime novels featuring private eye Philip Marlowe are largely credited with raising the crime/mystery genre into literary art. Just last week, Man Booker Prize Award-winning author John Banville, aka Benjamin Black, released a new Marlowe mystery, Black-eyed Blonde authorized by the Chandler estate, though when approached with the project, he admitted, “I hesitated for a long time.” A piece about his love of Chandler’s work and his own approach to resurrecting Philip Marlowe appeared in The Guardian, which you can read here. But as you can see from the pictures on the left, the face of Chandler’s detective has changed numerous times.

    1. Raymond Chandler
    2. The American cover for Black-eyed Blonde
    3. And the noir movie poster inspired UK cover
    4. Pulp covers of Chandler’s work often feature the dames over Marlowe.
    5. Chin and cigarette—if that’s not Bogie, then the Vintage edition certainly evokes him
    6. Bogart’s turn as Marlowe is so iconic, it’s hard to believe he only played the detective once. But that didn’t stop Penguin from placing him on the covers of Marlowe’s later adventures.
    7. Dick Powell’s turn as Marlowe in Murder, My Sweet, an adaptation of Farewell, My Lovely
    8. Followed by Robert Montgomery, who played Marlowe in Lady in the Lake
    9. Elliott Gould in Robert Altman’s critically acclaimed version of The Long Goodbye
    10. Before he was Rockford, James Garner played Marlowe in the eponymous film, based on Chandler’s The Little Sister.

  8. seattlemysterybooks:

1943 Grosset & Dunlap reissue
5th Philip Marlowe novel
Seattle Mystery Bookshop

    seattlemysterybooks:

    1943 Grosset & Dunlap reissue

    5th Philip Marlowe novel

    Seattle Mystery Bookshop

  9. seattlemysterybooks:

pulpcovers:

5 Murderers http://ift.tt/1giUHjM

2nd edition, 1945, with new cover art
contains:
"Goldfish", "Spanish Blood", "Blackmailers Don’t Shoot", "Guns at Cyrano’s" and "Nevada Gas"
first book appearances by these stories was in the 1st ed published in Feb 1944
Seattle Mystery Bookshop

    seattlemysterybooks:

    pulpcovers:

    5 Murderers http://ift.tt/1giUHjM

    2nd edition, 1945, with new cover art

    contains:

    "Goldfish", "Spanish Blood", "Blackmailers Don’t Shoot", "Guns at Cyrano’s" and "Nevada Gas"

    first book appearances by these stories was in the 1st ed published in Feb 1944

    Seattle Mystery Bookshop

  10. seattlemysterybooks:

pulpcovers:

5 Murderers (1944) http://ift.tt/1jZfy3I

1st printing, Feb. 3, 1944, 25¢
Avon #19, original artwork (artists not noted)
first appearance in book form by these five stories:
"Goldfish", "Spanish Blood", "Blackmailers Don’t Shoot", "Guns at Cyrano’s", and "Nevada Gas"
Seattle Mystery Bookshop

    seattlemysterybooks:

    pulpcovers:

    5 Murderers (1944) http://ift.tt/1jZfy3I

    1st printing, Feb. 3, 1944, 25¢

    Avon #19, original artwork (artists not noted)

    first appearance in book form by these five stories:

    "Goldfish", "Spanish Blood", "Blackmailers Don’t Shoot", "Guns at Cyrano’s", and "Nevada Gas"

    Seattle Mystery Bookshop

  11. ruckawriter:

It was about eleven o’clock in the morning, mid October, with the sun not shining and a look of hard wet rain in the clearness of the foothills. I was wearing my powder-blue suit, with dark blue shirt, tie and display handkerchief, black brogues, black wool socks with dark little clocks on them. I was neat, clean, shaved and sober, and I didn’t care who knew it. I was everything the well-dressed private detective ought to be. I was calling on four million dollars.

The opening to The Big Sleep.

Unsure of the illustration credit. Perhaps Wayne Barker?

Tom Adams. See all his Chandler covers here.

    ruckawriter:

    It was about eleven o’clock in the morning, mid October, with the sun not shining and a look of hard wet rain in the clearness of the foothills. I was wearing my powder-blue suit, with dark blue shirt, tie and display handkerchief, black brogues, black wool socks with dark little clocks on them. I was neat, clean, shaved and sober, and I didn’t care who knew it. I was everything the well-dressed private detective ought to be. I was calling on four million dollars.

    The opening to The Big Sleep.

    Unsure of the illustration credit. Perhaps Wayne Barker?

    Tom Adams. See all his Chandler covers here.

  12. In 2012, Dave Hooper adapted chapter 26 of The Big Sleep. Nice stuff.

    In 2012, Dave Hooper adapted chapter 26 of The Big Sleep. Nice stuff.

  13. Dave Hooper - Illustrations for The Big Sleep